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RC FAQs: Tips on how to buy used RCs and sell them

We have all been there and have all done it. For some, getting into the hobby is a financial burden as it can be a lot of money to sink. For other people it is not worth paying r to $700 for a brand new kit when you can get a used one for less. 

The main question is…. Is it worth the cash that you are about to lay on the line and what is and is not too much?

This article is for the person who wants to save some cash but also not get hosed. The advice in this article has served me well for years.

It can be great or it can be a bombshell….BUYER BEWARE!!!

Ah! The lovely smell of commerce and the secondary market is one where the consumer always wants the best for the cheapest price. If you are negotiating do not insult the seller by saying “what is the lowest price shipped you will sell this for?” I can honestly tell you that I am the kind of guy that will work with people and their budgets as I want to see them go to a good home. Most good RC’ers are this way as well. Insult us an that deal immediately goes bad.

Next, when you get the kit do not expect it to be new. It is used. This means that someone else had it and ran it. They:

1) May not be RC experts and have no idea what they were doing.
2) Have broken parts and may not have realized it
3) May consider things to be routine running and you may not.

You are saving cash by not buying new. If you want it to be perfect then buy new. 

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Squirrel TV 89: Nitro vs Electric Durability, Used Vehicles – What To Look For, Best Buggy?

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Rc Setup Guide PT 2 by Squirrel

RC Setup Guide PT 2

This is part two of two of the setup guide. There are 21 topics covered in total. Not all are covered below.

Vids in the series:
Part 11- Brakes
Part 12- Differentials
Part 13- Anti squat
Part 14- Gearing
Part 15- Kickup
Part 16- Throttle servo setup
Part 17- Wheel Balancing
Part 18- Lipo battery conversion for nitros
Part 19- Wheelbase
Part 20- Shock tower positions
Part 21- After race/ running procedures


Brake setup is important as it handles how gradually or how sharply you will stop. This will effect the weight transfer, stability, and control. There is a fine line between the two.

Some RC kits come with a thumbscrew adjustment that can be turned in or out. When the brakes are adjusted correctly, this adjustment will lengthen the use of the bar or shorten it. If you have one of these thumbscrews then turning it in will reduce the length of the brake rod and thus make the braking action seem more abrupt and sudden, and thus, leading to more weight transfer and instability.

The opposite is true if you lengthen it. The brake pads will have less to grab and hold onto. Thus, the braking action will be more gradual, or even to an extreme, non-existent.

Fixed brake levers work in the same manor as the above. Adjustments are made with the radio on to ensure that the brake comes on (the set screw that pulls on the lever) and releases (the set screw that pushes the brake into a clearing state) when they are supposed to.

These levers control a pivot arm that is blocked at the bottom. This block will push the brake pads out to grab the brake disc. The adjustment to this is the screw length. The less room the close pad has to be pushed to compress the disc against the pad that is attached to the screw head then the more abrupt the stop will be. Increasing the screw length will give more play in the braking and allow for a more gradual stop.

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RC Setup Guide PT 1 (vids 1 through 10) by Squirrel

Squirrel’s RC Set=up Guide PT 1

I have seen a lot of questions about set up or things that could be answered through proper setup. When you build a Pro level kit you will be introduced with a lot of tuning options. The astute builder will notice them and wonder why they are telling you to build the kit this way.

In order to answer these questions I went through a few Pro level manuals that I own. They do not explain all but I have written notes about the adjustments of each through my own research to know what it is exactly I am doing and adjusting. Then, as the years past, I have gained first hand knowledge and also other sources that have popped up that have helped out tremendously. Hopefully these collages of notes will you out as well. This is not complete by any means at all. The 21 subjects that are covered are a tip of the ice berg. However, the ones that I have chosen are either directly related to another or are the meat and potatoes of a good basis of understanding.

The key to a good basher, or a good racer, is a good setup. Racing is 90% skill. And that is very true. However, if your kit is miss-aligned then it will require 110% skill to overcompensate for the lack of setup and tuning. I do believe that the heart of the 90% skill comment is over the trends of buying the biggest and best engines, pipes, and electronics. However, I feel that there is so much you can do for arguably nothing that will make you look better than you could be… and that is set up.

[b[In this series[/b]

Vid 1- Camber-
Vid 2- Caster-
Vid 3 Ackerman-
Vid 4 clutchs-
Vid 5 downstops-
Vid 6 Ride Height-
Vid 7 Shocks-
Vid 8 Steering servo setup-
Vid 9 Toe-
Vid 10 Wings-

Vid 11 through 21 will appear on another guide.

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RC FAQs: Crawler Winch Install Guide by Squirrel

3 Racing Winch; 1/10th scale crawler accessory



The 3 racing crawler winch is designed to give your scaler the look of realism while also providing a functional winch that can actually pull moderately light objects. The link below will take you straight to the winch:…2010%20SCORPION

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RC FAQs: Bearings… all you ever wanted to know!! by Squirrel



Bearings have 4 main types of shields. Metal. rubber, teflon, and ceramic:

Metal-This is the cheapest bearing and the seal does a poor job of keeping dirt out. Best for onroad purposes as you will be cleaning regularly to keep dirt out. Also commonly found in clutch bells for nitros.

Rubber- Restricts bearing movement and spin. However, the rubber shields protect the bearing from dirt. This makes up for the metal bearing’s in ability to protect the inner part of the bearing. This is ideal for offroad though there is speed consequences. Best used for casual racing or RTR kits over the reduced performance.

Teflon- Work great for racers and those who want performance. They block dirt and spin very free. They are like the best of the metal and rubber worlds. The difference between teflon and ceramic is cost, ability to seal, and while teflon offers greater heat resistance over metal and rubber it is rivaled by ceramic’s ability.

Ceramic- Most costly. However, it offers a better longevity and also heat resistance over the teflon. Offers the best spinning ability and also blockage to dirt. These are the most expensive but the best out there. Hardcore racers, and Squirrel, strive for these and then teflon if not available.

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RC FAQs: How to solder dual battery adapters for single ESCs by Squirrel


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RC FAQs: How to Solder Traxxas Connectors by Squirrel


Out of all of the connectors out there the Traxxas ones are the easiest!

The main concept to them is:

1) presolder the tab up to the marked line
2) pretin the wire by applying solder onto it first
3) heat the tab and the wire up at the same time.
4) slide the tab into the connector

Place the tabs on a piece of wood (something that is flat and that can take the heat) with the marked lines face up.

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RC FAQs: Maintaining Your RC by Squirrel

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